Thursday, October 25, 2012

 

Friday Fragments

This piece on the implications for higher ed in the election is well worth a read.  Among other things, it helps to explain the thinking behind the abrupt cut in student lifetime Pell grant eligibility from 18 semesters to 12.  Apparently, Republicans wanted to cut funding for the program, and Democrats wanted to preserve the maximum value of a grant, so the compromise was to keep the dollar cap but reduce the number of students eligible.  

-----------

The Wife: You can be anything you want to be.

The Girl: Except a bird!

-----------

Workforce training matters, but the first order of business is getting the economy rolling.  When people go through programs with no job waiting for them on the other end, it doesn’t help much.  

In my darker moments, I wonder if some of the political consensus on training as the answer is a function of a sort of venn diagram; it’s one of the few areas of overlap between the parties.  The conservatives don’t want to stimulate aggregate demand, since that might involve a short-term sacrifice by their base.  And the liberals are too timid to push the full Keynesian treatment.  So we pretend that the employment freefall from 2007 to 2009 was a function of tectonic shifts in job skills, rather than the inevitable collapse of what amounted to a Ponzi scheme.  If the problem is unskilled workers, then we all know, more or less, what needs to be done.  If the problem is unregulated finance capital, then the political consensus evaporates.

I’m glad to support training programs in fields with genuine prospects for graduates.  But in fields with limited or negative demand, it’s hard to argue that the obstacle to prosperity is a lack of workers.  Any long-suffering adjunct knows that.

----------

Since The Wife started working in the local elementary school, she has been coming home with stories about the things the kids there say and do.  

Yesterday at dinner she shared with us the way she says the Pledge of Allegiance in class.

I pledge allegiance to the flag
Ryan, look at the flag!
of the United States of America
Look at the flag! Over there!
And to the republic for which it stands
Get your hands out of your pants!
One nation, under God
Put that down!  
Indivisible, with liberty
Madison!  Hailey!  MADISON!!
And justice for all
Sit down, Tyler.  Sit down, Tyler.  Tyler?  Tyler!

There’s the pledge as written, and there’s the pledge as performed by a roomful of squirmy first graders.  

Somehow, the latter is more reassuring.  Any lit critters looking for a “reader response” exercise in its rawest form should watch some first graders in action sometime.  

Comments:
your friday posts always bring a smile.
 
"the liberals are too timid to push the full Keynesian treatment"

I think this is inaccurate. At the one narrow moment in time when there was a realization that we were on our way to (but were actually in) a Depression, liberals pushed the biggest Keynesian treatment ever attempted and it passed. It wasn't big enough, because the fact that it was a Depression wasn't realized until later, but it was done.

After that, including in the past year, liberals (and conservative economists) pushed additional Keynesian stimulus but Republicans halted it with either a filibuster in the Senate or a vote in the House. They did let a transportation bill pass, but late enough that they hoped it wouldn't help before the election.

"conservatives don’t want to stimulate aggregate demand, since that might involve a short-term sacrifice by their base."

Except no sacrifice is required for stimulus, and the result is actually good for the billionaires.

You are too charitable, since Mitch McConnell told all of us that their goal was to do as much damage to the economy as possible to ensure the defeat of the President. That is why they opposed creating jobs in the construction industry and created a "fiscal cliff" to scare off business investment.

If you read between the lines of the Fed announcements of QE3, you will see that they would rather see the Republicans stimulate the economy the usual way rather than have to do it with interest rates.
 
I really like your blog and have one with similar information. If you have time check it out.fuel treatment
 
Many of the older properties in London and even some of the newer ones are prone to drainage problems. With everything from root growing into pipes, your own home waste blocking the pipe, to leaves and gravel being washed into the storm drains, there are a million and one things that can cause pipes inside and outside your home to be blocked.
london drain cleaning

 
Many of the older properties in London and even some of the newer ones are prone to drainage problems. With everything from root growing into pipes, your own home waste blocking the pipe, to leaves and gravel being washed into the storm drains, there are a million and one things that can cause pipes inside and outside your home to be blocked.This is why it is very important to keep those drains free of debris to prevent them from becoming blocked. London drain cleaning will keep your pipes flowing freely to keep your property safe.
drain cleaning london

 
Levels of debt are higher within London than anywhere else in the country. Debt has a huge impact on many people’s lives and can affect us in ways that we would not initially expect. Debt can cause mental health problems, problems for our families and friends as well as making it difficult to work.

debt advice london
 
Post a Comment

<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?